If Only (2021)

Hypertext Reflection

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Prologue: on the structure of the reflection

The reflection for the performance If Only has been written as a hypertext document. This is an attempt at creating a reflection that can be read as an open text: sequential and multilinear. Under each heading the reflection is written sequentially, yet it’s possible to move between these headings in a multilinear way. Established by Theodor H Nelson in the 1960´s, hypertext is considered as non-sequential writing connected by links, allowing the reader to choose different pathways in the reading. George Landow argues that the strength in hypertext lies in the ability for users to “find, create and follow multiple conceptual structures in the same body of information” (Landow, 2006, p.10). This embodies a post-structuralist understanding of the open text through an electronic medium.

 

If Only manifests itself as an expression that works with language, it’s connections, questioning how meaning in constructed in multilinear ways. The web-based format makes it possible for me to collect, connect and display different texts, references, fragments and thus lay open the interlinked processes at the heart of the project. 

Table of contents

Concept

Formats for working 

Openings 

   - Derrida

   - Interxtuality | Open Text | Nonlinear

   - Particularity of words

   - Fragmentations

   - Performance as practice

Manifesto for performativity

Qualities of performativity

Methods

   - Methods

   - Example of tasks 

   - Sound Collaboration

   - Tools & Turning points

   - Dramaturgy Constructions deconstructed

Modules

Future Thinkings

language

nonlinear

structures

form

meaning making

scores

improvisation

multilinear

pliable form

performance as research

listening

failure

fragmentation

layers

intertextuality

voice

potentiality

networks

construction

text

risk

potentials

deconstruction

unforeseeable

sound

microphones

clarity

open text

repetition

modules

agency

nodes

specificity

movement

movement motifs

weaving

texture

subtle nuances

voice

voice

Anne Boyer

Microphones

Language

Dance mats

Pliable form

Modules

Open text

Barthes

Derrida

Movement

Dramaturgy

Questioning
own methods

Challenges

Weaving

Sound Collaboration

What gets chosen

Meg Stuart

Structuring the unanticipated

Delimination vs
Restriction

Texts

Scores

Particularity of words

Qualities of 
Performativity

Manifesto for
performativity

Timeline of events

Dilemmas with
collective agency

Future thinking

Fragmentations

Removing a
core idea

Sneaky runs

indeterminacy

potentiality